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"This Is Parkway" Digital Magazine

Project Parkway

Subcommitte 1/B/2 Essential Question:
At what level is instructional leadership supporting best practices in the classroom?

9/28/2009: What data will be collected to reveal current reality?

Leadership for Instructional Best Practices
a. Coaching and Development (Alli Rudich)

  • Panel interviews with coaches
  • Dan Coates's Literacy Coach survey data 09 - 10
  • Staff Development Program Evaluation Spring 2008
  • Survey of developers, TISs, Progress Monitors, coordinators, and coaches about activity in the year since the SD Program Eval was completed.

b. Supervision and PLCs for Best Practices (Becky Langrall)

  • Administrator survey
  • Lead Teacher survey of Building Leadership Teams, Advisory Committees, Principal's Councils, PLC/Building Cohort/PLT/Critical Friends groups
  • Panel interviews (teacher, administrator)

c. Evaluation of Teachers/Administrators in Support of Best Instructional Practices (Barbara Moore)

  • Document Review: Comparison of Parkway's 0 - 30 model and Parkway's Teaching Standards with Danielson's Framework for Enhancing Professional Practice and the new Missouri Teaching Standards: http://www.dese.mo.gov/divteachqual/teachcert/documents/Model_Teaching_Standards.pdf
  • Focus groups, stakeholders about the current evaluation criteria for their position
  • NEA Fall 2009 client survey as appropriate (tentative)

3/1/2010: Key Findings

A. Positive Observations Revealed by the Data

Professional Development
Elementary Teachers, Librarians, and Counselors Survey Data
(n=41; 41% w/7 yrs exp or less; 46% w/ 7 years or less in Pkwy; 58% w/ 7 yrs or less in their current bldg.)

Building-based PD:

  • 97% of teachers agree or strongly agree that learning improves after they collaborate with a fellow teacher.
  • 90% of teachers collaborate with another teacher either daily or weekly to increase their learning.
  • Most beneficial for delivering PD are grade level/content-alike meeting time, PLC/cohort/Critical Friends groups, literacy coaching and coaching with the curriculum coordinator
  • 76% of teachers agree or strongly agree that learning improves after they have collaborated with a TIS.
  • 70% agree or strongly agree that learning improves after they have collaborated with an administrator.
  • 68% of teachers collaborate with a building administrator monthly or weekly to increase their learning.
  • 66% of teachers collaborate with a literacy coach monthly or weekly to increase their learning
  • 58% of teachers agree or strongly agree that student learning improves after they have collaborated with a literacy coach.
  • 56% of teachers collaborate with a TIS monthly or weekly to increase their learning.


District-Based PD

  • Most beneficial are coordinator summer development, salary credit courses, release day development and out-of-district workshops.


Secondary Teachers, Librarians, and Counselors Survey Data
(n = 58; 58% with 13 yrs exp or more; 58.6% w/ 7 or less years in their current buildings)

  • 94% agree or strongly agree when collaborating with a fellow teacher student learning improved.
  • 88% agree or strongly agree that collaborating with a fellow teacher on a daily or weekly basis increased professional learning.
  • 80% agree or strongly agree that student learning improved when they collaborated with a TIS
  • Grade level and content-alike meeting time was valued most highly for building-based development time, followed by team time and TIS coaching.
  • For district-based development, teachers rated the following as most beneficial:
    • Teacher-led sessions on district PD days
    • Release day development
    • Coordinator led summer development

Teachers in Professional Learning Communities Survey Data (n = 32)

  • 81% agree or strongly agree that their building’s student achievement has been most helped by the time teachers spend problem solving with fellow content teachers about students’ needs.
  • 65% always or often use the feedback collected during the course of the unit to adjust instruction during the course of a unit.
  • 64.5% always or often use what they learn about students outside of class to inform their understanding of how best to teach them
  • 64% always or often share with other teachers what they know about students that they have learned from their extracurricular activities
  • 61.3% report that meeting time is tied to student achievement
  • 61% feel that the curriculum coordinator plays a valuable role in fostering communication across grade levels.
  • 48% meet once or twice a month to engage in PLC activities – discussing students work, discussing lesson plans, and examining achievement data/developing action plans
  • Teachers value honesty and openness in the conversations they have with their administrators about their practice; they appreciate recognition for what they are doing well and constructive feedback on ways to grow
  • Types of feedback teachers report most often receiving from students include: Information on students’ learning styles, how clear they are re: directions and instructional targets, pacing, what’s hard, strengths, interests and requests for varied assessments.


PMCs, Lit Coaches, T.I.Ss, Developers Survey Data
(n = 27; 67% lit coaches; 14% TIS; 11% developers; 7% PMCs)

  • Sources of greatest benefit for this group’s professional development are: Curriculum coordinators, book study, district development, and out-of-district workshops
  • 78% agree or strongly agree that the development they provide results in improved student learning as measured by grades and tests.
  • 77% agree or strongly agree that they are satisfied with the professional development they receive through Parkway
  • 77% are satisfied with the development they provide teachers.
  • 63% report engaging in their own professional development on a daily basis
  • 50% spend the most time with teachers with 0 – 5 years experience
  • 45% report spending 50 – 75% of their day engaged in job embedded coaching.
  • 41% report spending more than 75% of their day engaged in job embedded coaching

Building Administrators
(n = 33; 41% principals; 58% assistant principals; 62% for < 8 years; 63% elementary)

  • Rank district development in UbD as the most beneficial form of PD in which they have engaged, followed by collaboration with/mentoring by an out-of-district building administrator and collaboration with/mentoring by a within-district building administrator
  • 70% report being satisfied with the development they offer teachers.
  • 54.8% directly facilitate development for their building on a monthly basis
  • 42% coordinate development on a weekly or daily basis
  • 48% report that >75% of their staff has worked with a TIS on an individual basis

District Administrators (n = 12)

  • 83% rank out-of-district conferences and workshops as the most beneficial for their development
  • 75% of coordinators (n = 8) indicate that they meet often or somewhat often with teacher leaders to provide development.
  • 75% of district administrators who are not curriculum coordinators (n = 4) indicate that they meet often or somewhat often with their direct reports to provide professional development themselves.
  • 66.6% are satisfied with the development they provided to teachers
  • 63.3% are satisfied with the development they provided to other district administrators

Evaluation
Elementary Teachers, Librarians, Counselors (n = 41; 41% w/7 yrs exp or less; 46% w/ 7 years or less in Pkwy; 58% w/ 7 yrs or less in their current bldg)

  • 71% worked with 30 students or less
  • 74% agreed or strongly agreed that the evaluation process has an impact on their development
  • 77% of comments were positive, e.g., administrators pointed out areas of growth and offered ideas; they give specific feedback; they were encouraging; they give me the big picture…
  • 69% agreed or strongly agreed that they left their post-observation conference with usable feedback.

Secondary Teachers, Librarians, Counselors
(n = 58; 58% with 13 yrs exp or more; 58.6% w/ 7 or less years in their current buildings)

  • 46% agreed or strongly agreed that the evaluation process had an impact on their development
  • 62% agreed or strongly agreed that they left their post-observation conference with usable feedback.


Building Administrators
(n = 33; 41% principals; 58% assistant principals; 62% for < 8 years; 63% elementary)

  • 76% agreed or strongly agreed that they used the teacher evaluation process as a form of professional development, mentioning reflective dialogue, goal setting, and instructional strategies to try.
  • 75% agreed or strongly agreed that the Parkway teaching standards help to support effective instruction.
  • 64% checked the OCG before making judgments about teacher effectiveness.

SLAC Student Feedback on what makes a good teacher (n = 30; from CH, FH, NH, and WH)

  • • A good teacher:
    • Is approachable, makes kids feel comfortable, is non-judgmental and laid back but still serious about the subject.
    • uses demos, understands his/her students, shares stories, is honest about situations, is trustworthy.
    • takes some responsibility when the whole class doesn’t understand the lesson.
    • listens and respects the students as individuals.
    • learns from student input.
    • is involved in activities (they know the students better and can relate)
    • is understandable and gets involved in the subject and relates it to present day
    • uses hands on activities or demonstrations
    • lets them know in advance what is happening that day and why they are doing the lesson.
    • asks how they can improve their teaching skills.
    • listens to kids.
    • can be funny but knows when to be serious about subject.
    • has prepared well for the class.

PNEA Fall 2009 Survey (n = 727 elementary, middle, and high school union members; number of individual teachers with comments = 110; data below are based on comments)

  • 11 members of the 110 who wrote comments were positive about the evaluation process.

Supervision
Elementary Teachers, Librarians, and Counselors
(n = 41; 41% w/7 yrs exp or less; 46% w/ 7 years or less in Pkwy; 58% w/ 7 yrs or less in their current bldg.)

  • The types of supervision most experienced were walkthroughs, collaborative conversations, nondirective/reflective conversations for growth, scheduled observations, and observation of other teachers
  • 77% of teachers, librarians, and counselors agreed or strongly agreed that they have grown as a result of the supervisory practices of their administrator in the area of assessment; 74% in the area of data literacy; 62.5% in the area of communication with parents and students; and 50% each in the areas of classroom management and relationships with colleagues.
  • UbD and clarity of instructional targets were additional frequently cited areas of growth.
  • Of teachers, librarians, and counselors in years two or three (n = 10), 100% received curricular coaching from a coordinator in the past year.
  • 83% of teachers, librarians, and counselors in this group strongly agreed or agreed that they had grown as a result of the supervisory practices of their coordinator re: technology resources and related development; 83% re: assessment development; 78% re: materials/resources; 70% re: data literacy; 67% re: communication with parents and students; 61% re: relationships with colleagues; 61% re: UbD-based curriculum writing development

Secondary Teachers, Librarians, and Counselors
(n=58; 58% with 13 yrs exp or more; 58.6% w/ 7 or less years in their current buildings)

  • Walkthroughs, scheduled observations and collaborative conversations formed the bulk of the supervisory experiences of these teachers.
  • Teachers valued positive and constructive feedback.
  • Of teachers, librarians, and counselors in years two or three (n = 12), 83% received curriculum coaching from a curriculum coordinator in the past year.
  • 85% of secondary teachers, librarians, and counselors in this group strongly agreed or agreed that they had grown as a result of the supervisory practices of their coordinator re: technology resources and related development; 84% re: materials/resources; 76% re: UbD-based curriculum writing development; 75% re: assessment and 50% in data literacy.


Building Administrators
(n = 33; 41% principals; 58% assistant principals; 62% for < 8 years; 63% elementary)

  • 96% reported knowing how to engage in coaching for improvement type conversations
  • 78% conferred with administrators in their buildings on how to supervise teachers
  • 61% engaged in walk-throughs between September and February once a week or more.
  • 43% supervised one or two content areas
  • Found walk-throughs and unscheduled classroom visits to be most helpful when supervising teachers.
  • Relied on conversations with colleagues, workshops, and books as the most common ways to strengthen their skills as an instructional supervision
  • Most often recommended that a teacher partner with another teacher in the building when the administrator discovered weaknesses in the teacher’s practice.


Elementary Teachers, Librarians, and Counselors
(n = 41; 41% w/7 yrs exp or less; 46% w/ 7 years or less in Pkwy; 58% w/ 7 yrs or less in their current bldg.)

  • The types of supervision most experienced were walkthroughs, collaborative conversations, nondirective/reflective conversations for growth, scheduled observations, and observation of other teachers
  • 77% of teachers, librarians, and counselors agreed or strongly agreed that they had grown as a result of the supervisory practices of their administrator in the area of assessment; 74% in the area of data literacy; 62.5% in the area of communication with parents and students; and 50% each in the areas of classroom management and relationships with colleagues.
  • UbD and clarity of instructional targets were additional frequently cited areas of growth.
  • Of teachers, librarians, and counselors in years two or three (n = 10), 100% received curricular coaching from a coordinator in the past year.
  • 83% of teachers, librarians, and counselors in this group strongly agreed or agreed that they had grown as a result of the supervisory practices of their coordinator re: technology resources and related development; 83% re: assessment development; 78% re: materials/resources; 70% re: data literacy; 67% re: communication with parents and students; 61% re: relationships with colleagues; 61% re: UbD-based curriculum writing development
B. Identified Needs

Professional Development
Elementary Teachers, Librarians, and Counselor survey data
(n = 41; 41% w/7 yrs exp or less; 46% w/ 7 years or less in Pkwy; 58% w/ 7 yrs or less in their current bldg.)

  • 75% are less than 12 years in the field and 40% have been teaching less than 7 years.
  • 54% rarely or never participate in district-based development designed to increase awareness and understanding of social justice
  • Want more team planning time
  • 40% rarely or never participate in building-based development designed to increase awareness and understanding of social justice
  • Would like:
    • more coaching in the areas of differentiated instruction for students with IEPs, equity, higher order thinking, and cultural differences
    • more opportunities to collaborate with teachers across the district
    • more follow through on what was learned in district workshops

Secondary Teachers, Librarians, and Counselors Survey data
(n = 58; 58% with 13 yrs exp or more; 58.6% w/ 7 or less years in their current buildings)

Suggestions from this group for increasing the effectiveness of building-based staff
development include:

  • Time to lesson plan based on what was learned directly after the learning
  • A school-wide vision that dictates the development
  • More time to plan with same-subject teachers
  • More ongoing input from teachers

Suggestions from this group for increasing the effectiveness of district-based staff development include:

  • Scheduled time for practice and development of new learning
  • More observations of teachers and schools whose work is considered “best practice”
  • For instructional leaders to have a clear vision for themselves and higher expectations for teacher accountability for this time (e.g., develop a concrete product)
  • Survey teachers’ strengths and use them to deliver development.

Other findings:

  • 41% of teachers rarely or never have participated in building-based activities designed to increase awareness and understanding of social justice.
  • 49% of teachers rarely or never have participated in district-based activities designed to increase awareness and understanding of social justice.
  • Need to supply support for diverse staff regarding cultural differences.

Teachers in Professional Learning Communities (n = 32)

  • 75% have never engaged in a learning walk.
  • 71% disagree or strongly disagree that there is enough time built into the schedule to collaborate with colleagues on joint planning and assessment.
  • 68% disagree or strongly disagree that there is enough time to interact with teachers at other levels around students’ learning needs.
  • 71% disagree or strongly disagree that there is enough time to interact with teachers at other levels around curriculum.
  • 65% disagree or strongly disagree that there is enough time to plan with SSD teachers around students’ learning needs.
  • 60% have invited colleagues once a year or never invited colleagues to come and watch them teach and then give them feedback.
  • 53% would like to meet once a week or more with content-alike teachers.
  • The type of information these teachers would like to receive from their students’ previous teachers and to give to their students’ next-year’s teachers would be about strengths, needs, interests, and learning styles in order to improve instructional effectiveness.
  • To take advantage of a peer coach, these teachers overwhelmingly indicated the need for built-in time.


SLAC Group Interview Data (n = 30 from NH, FH, CH, and WH)

  • Students want their teachers to:
    • provide more interactive learning
    • explain more and slow down
    • relate the lesson to how the students will use information in real life.
    • incorporate more demos, examples, and visual aids.
    • use laptops for lectures (easier to edit and organize with word processing)
    • put notes and mp3 recordings of lectures on line.
    • have empathy and offer suggestions in a non-judgmental way
    • tell them the truth about their work with constructive criticism
    • let them have more say in their learning
    • provide more help for students who disrupt
    • promote respect among students for diverse groups
  • Students felt that some of the teachers are uncomfortable with using technology and needed more help with various forms.


PMCs, Lit Coaches, T.I.Ss, Developers
(n=27; 67% lit coaches; 14% TIS; 11% developers; 7% PMCs)

  • 82% are neutral, disagree, or strongly disagree that they are satisfied with the professional development they provide building administrators.
  • Factors inhibiting this group from supporting more teachers are:
    • Building schedule, meetings, and so many requests
  • 63% report that they have rarely or never participated in school-based professional development aimed at increasing awareness and understanding of social justice.
  • 60% report that they deliver development to administrators less than once a month or never.
  • 51% have rarely or never participated in school-based professional development aimed at increasing awareness and understanding of social justice.

Building Administrators
(n=33; 41% principals; 58% assistant principals; 62% for < 8 years; 63% elementary)

  • 70% report that they sometimes, rarely, or never participate in school-based development designed to increase awareness and understanding of social justice.
  • 63.6% indicated that they sometimes, rarely, or never have participated in development designed to increase awareness and understanding of social justice
  • 60% are neutral, disagree, or strongly disagree that they are satisfied with the district development provided to administrators.
  • 51.6% engage in their own professional development once a month or less
  • 51.5% are neutral or disagree that the Parkway staff development model is more effective than that of other districts in which the administrator has worked.
  • 48.6% are neutral, disagree, or strongly disagree that they are satisfied with the district development provided for teachers

District Administrators (n = 12)

  • 100% never meet with a Progress Monitoring Coach
  • 80% sometimes, rarely, or never engage in social justice development at the school level.
  • 70% rarely or never meet with a literacy coach
  • 70% rarely or never meet with a Technology Integration Specialist
  • 58.3% are neutral, disagree or strongly disagree that they are satisfied with Parkway professional development for teachers
  • 58% sometimes or rarely participate in district-based professional development around awareness and understanding of social justice


Evaluation
Elementary Teachers, Librarians, Counselors Survey Data
(n = 41; 41% w/7 yrs exp or less; 46% w/ 7 years or less in Pkwy; 58% w/ 7 yrs or less in their current bldg.)

  • 26% were neutral, disagreed or strongly disagreed that their evaluation process had an impact on their development.
  • 8 out of 36 comments suggested the process was not motivating or beneficial, felt like it was a formality or ‘generic.’
  • 31% were neutral, disagreed or strongly disagreed that they left their post observation conference with usable feedback from an administrator regarding their practice.


Secondary Teachers, Librarians, Counselors Survey Data
(n = 58; 58% with 13 yrs exp or more; 58.6% w/ 7 or less years in their current buildings)

  • 54% were neutral, disagreed, or strongly disagreed that the evaluation process had an impact on their development.
  • 36% of comments indicated that there was little or no impact; that it felt like a formality.
  • 38% were neutral, disagreed or strongly disagreed that they left their post observation conference with usable feedback from an administrator regarding their practice.


Building Administrator Survey Data
(n = 33; 41% principals; 58% assistant principals; 62% with experience < 8 years; 63% elementary)

  • 24% were neutral or disagreed that they use the teacher evaluation process as a form of professional development.
  • 46.4% have never recommended that a teacher be reassigned or let go because of instructional weakness.


PNEA Fall 2009 Survey (n = 727 K – 12 certified staff members; number of individual teachers with comments = 110; data below are based on comments)

  • 93% of comments collected expressed concerns about the teacher evaluation process. Concerns mentioned most were as follows:
  • 27 members indicated that the evaluation process seemed inconsistent among buildings and administrators.
  • 20 members indicated that the administration was either not involved or did not observe them in the preceding academic year.
  • 12 members indicated the evaluation process to be ineffective.
  • 11 members expressed concerns about the administrator/teacher relationship.
  • 10 members called for improved administrator evaluation.

Supervision
Elementary Teachers, Librarians, and Counselors
(n = 41; 41% w/7 yrs exp or less; 46% w/ 7 years or less in Pkwy; 58% w/ 7 yrs or less in their current bldg.)

  • 75% are less than 12 years in the field
  • 40% have been teaching less than 7 years

Secondary Teachers, Librarians, and Counselors
(n = 58; 58% with 13 yrs exp or more; 58.6% w/ 7 or less years in their current buildings)

  • 58.6% report collaborating with a building-based administrator less than once a month or never to increase their professional learning.


Teachers in Professional Learning Communities (n = 32)

  • 48.3% of these teachers do not feel that they receive effective supervision from their building administrator.
  • Comments indicated a desire for more input, more informal exchange, more positive feedback not just feedback when there’s a problem


Building Administrators
(n = 33; 41% principals; 58% assistant principals; 62% for < 8 years; 63% elementary)

  • 35.5% of secondary administrators supervise 5 or more content areas
  • 50% sometimes or rarely receive input and suggestions from their own supervisors.
  • While 96% report knowing how to engage in coaching for improvement type conversations, they engage teachers this way 50% of the time or less in the context of evaluations.
  • Would like more opportunities to work with administrators in other buildings around supervision of the same departments the administrator supervises
  • Would like the lesson evaluation instrument to be streamlined

District Administrators (n = 12)

  • 37.5% of curriculum coordinators (n = 8) indicated that they rarely meet with teachers in years two and three to provide curriculum coaching.
C. (If Necessary) Additional Data Needed

Professional Development

  • The vast majority of teachers, librarians, and counselors report benefiting from collaborating with a peer. Do some types of collaboration relate more strongly to best practices and improved student learning than others?
  • ¾ of elementary teachers, librarians, and counselors and 5/6 of secondary teachers, librarians, and counselors feel that contact with a TIS resulted in improved student learning. High school students interviewed would like more access to technology and feel their teachers need more development. Are some types of technology knowledge for teaching more valuable than others for quality instruction and if so, what are they?
  • High school students interviewed see a need for more respect for diversity within students; few administrators and teachers have engaged in social justice training at the school level. What models exist to address this gap in a way that would translate into best instructional practices and improved student respect?
  • What type of development (content and structure) would district administrators find beneficial for themselves as it relates to instructional leadership for best practices?
  • Slightly more than half of building administrators see room for improvement in Parkway’s professional development for teachers. What type of development (content and structure) would district administrators find more beneficial to support teachers use of best practices?
  • What type and how many developers (TISs, literacy coaches, progress monitors) are needed to facilitate best practices to the extent needed?

Evaluation

  • Why do 2/3 of elementary teachers, librarians, and counselors surveyed feel that teacher evaluation has a positive impact on their development compared to less than half of secondary teachers, librarians, and counselors surveyed?
  • Why do 54% of secondary teachers, librarians, and counselors say they are neutral, disagree or strongly disagree that the evaluation process has a positive impact on their development, but 62% agree or strongly agree that they leave their post-observation conference with usable feedback?
  • Why has almost half of the building administrators surveyed never recommended a teacher for reassignment or dismissal?
  • Almost 2/3 (63%) of building administrator surveys came from elementary administrators and almost 2/3 (62%) had 7 or less years of experience. What might data reveal coming from more secondary administrators and administrators at all levels with more experience about evaluation for best practices?

Supervision

  • Over a third of the building administrators surveyed indicated that they must supervise 5 or more content areas. Between 48% - 58% of secondary teachers, librarians, and counselors report minimal or limited input from their supervisor. What models exist to address teacher, librarian and counselors’ wishes to have more input from their administrators that have yielded a positive impact on instruction?
  • 50% of building administrators report sometimes or rarely receiving input from their supervisor. What models exist describing effective supervision of administrators by their supervisors that have yielded a positive impact on instruction?
  • What keeps some curriculum coordinators (n = 3) from meeting with teachers in years two and three to provide curriculum coaching for best instructional practices?