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Social Studies

Kindergarten

Social Studies K - Children: Here, There and Long Ago(Link opens to previous resource page for Parkway K-2 Teachers)

Additional resources organized by unit are below.

1.  The History of Me

  • Who Am I?:  From Starfall.com, a "free public service to motivate children to read with phonics", Who Am I? is an interactive site that mixes reading skills with a series of fun activities where students can design a character that matches their physical characteristics to guide them through a series of matching exercises about their bodies, bathrooms, living rooms, and kitchen.  A voiceover announces the words when they are selected by the students.  This site could be used on an interactive WhiteBoard with students or on computer stations for the students.

2.  Children from Other Lands

  • Africa for Kids:  From PBS Kids, this site introduces students to African culture through photos, music, artwork, and literature.  Stuents are able to create their own African music and artwork and listen to a narrator read to them a Swahili folktale.
     
  • Ancient Greeks: From the BBC, this site for primary children introduces students to everyday life in Ancient Greece.  The section, "Growing up in Greece", describes everything from what children learned in school to the types of toys they played with.
     
  • Anglo Saxons:  From the BBC, this site for primary children introduces students to everyday life for Anglo Saxons in the past.  The section, "Growing Up", describes the differences between growing up a boy versus growing up a girl and introduces students to the toys and games played by children.
     
  • Going to School Around the World Activity Book:  From Unicef, this activity book in .pdf format introduces students to "key issues and obstacles that children face around the world to enjoy their right to a quality education."  Although designed for children aged 6-9, many of these activities could be used with some varying levels of scaffolding.
     
  • Romans:  From the BBC, this site for primary children introduces students to everyday life in Ancient Rome.  The section, "Family and Children", describes family life, school, toys, and the kinds of food children ate.
     
  • Victorian Britain:  From the BBC, this site for primary children introduces students to everyday life in Victorian Britain.  This site describes nearly every aspect of the life of a child during this time period including their work in coal mines and factories to the types of toys they had and the games they played.
     
  • Vikings:  From the BBC, this site for primary children introduces students to everyday life as a Viking.  The section, "Family Life", describes everything from the roles of children in the family to the types of toys they played with.
     

3.  Me on the Map

  • Fairy Tale Maps:  From the Utah Education Network, this site includes resources and lesson ideas for helping students "understand the concept of maps by describing the path that Little Red Riding Hood took on the way to Grandma's house."

     
  • Interactive Map - Using a Compass Rose:  From Education Place, this site includes an interactive map of a neighborhood and poses three questions to students that engages them in the use of the compass rose to find the correct answer.

  • Missouri Interactive Maps:  From the Center for Applied Research and Environmental Systems, this site allows users to create a statewide, county, city, town, or school district map.  Users can also add climate, demographic, agricultural, and soil layers to any map that they create.  A great resource for teachers.
     
  • St. Louis Zoo Map:  From 360 St. Louis, this .jpg of the Zoo could be easily printed out for individual student use or projected on an interactive WhiteBoard for a whole class activity.
     
  • The Orientometer:  From National Geographic, this activity gives students the opportunity to earn "Cardinal Points" by correctly identifying North, South, West, Northeast, Northwest, Southeast, and Southwest - East is identified for them.  Students earn a point for each one they get correct - they have to keep track of their own scores.
     
  • USA Map Games:  From Sheppard Software, this site includes many interactive games for USA geography.  Each game is presented in levels that vary in degree of difficulty from "Tutorial" to "Cartographer" and includes a voiceover announcing the name of the state or region when selected.
     
  • World Continent Games:  From Sheppard Software, this site includes interactive games for world geography.  Each game is presented in levels that vary in degree of difficulty from "Tutorial" to "Expert" and includes a voiceover announcing the name of the continent or ocean when selected.
     
  • Your Neighborhood:  From Ben's Guide to Government for Kids, this is a simple map of a neighborhood including the basic facilities that typically exist in a neighborhood.  Each icon on the man can be selected to find out a brief summary of each of the locations, i.e. school.

 4.  This is My Country

  • 5-Pointed Star in One Snip:  From US History.org, this site includes an activity that teaches students how to easily fold and cut a "symmetrical five-pointed star" like those on the American flag.
     
  • History of the Fourth:  From PBS, this site includes a resource for the history and etiquette of the American Flag.
     
  • Symbols of the U.S. Government - The Flag:  From Ben's Guide to Government for Kids, this site provides a simple explanation of the symbolism for the stars and stripes and includes a link to a full report on the history of the American Flag.
     
  • Symbols of the United States:  From Enchanted Learning, this site includes graphics and summaries of the various symbols and structures that represent the United States.  There are also links to coloring pages for many of these symbols, including coins and currency.
     
  • The Pledge of Allegiance:  From Ben's Guide to Government for Kids, this is a simple presentation of the text of the Pledge.
       
  • US Flag Picture Timeline:  From US History.org, this site includes an illustrated timeline of the evolution of the American flag from 1775 to today.
     

5.  Wants and Needs

  • A Perfect PetFrom EconEdLink, this site includes a lesson plan for teaching students about the economic concepts of choice, wants, scarcity, and decision making within a context that they can relate to.

  • Everyday OpportunitiesFrom EconEdLink, this site includes a lesson plan for teaching students about the economic concepts of choice, decision making, and opportunity cost within the context of good and bad choices made in the classroom that day.

  • That's Not Fair!  How Do We Share?From EconEdLink, this site includes a lesson plan for teaching students about the economic concepts of decision making, wants, goods, opportunity cost, and scarcity within the context of sharing a limited number of goods in a classroom.

  • The MittenFrom EconEdLink, this site includes a lesson plan for teaching students about the economic concept of scarcity through the story of The Mitten.

  • Toys for Me:  A Lesson on ChoiceFrom EconEdLink, this site includes a lesson plan for teaching students about the economic concepts of choice, costs, scarcity, and wants within the context of choosing a toy.

6.  Kids Helping Kids

  • Charity Guide:  Children's Issues: This site provides multiple ideas for how to make a difference in a child's life.  Opportunities are organized by ideas that take 15 minutes, a few hours, or that can be done while on vacation. 
     
  • Community Service Projects:  From AfterSchool.gov, this site includes ideas from a variety of federal agencies for service projects.
     
  • Kids Next Door:  From the Department of Housing and Urban Development, this site contains ideas for community service and includes community-related educational materials and activities for children.
     
  • Miniature Earth Project: A fascinating look at the statistical breakdown of the world's population if it were reduced to only 100 people.  This really highlights the impoverished conditions that a large portion of our world population lives in.
     
  • National Service Learning Clearinghouse:  From Service Learning.org, this site contains a vast amount of service learning ideas and examples sorted by grade.